Is shrimp good for diabetics is a question many people ask themselves. In this article, we will answer that question and also provide more information on the nutrition of shrimp as well as safety facts that you need to know before eating it. So is eating shrimp good for diabetics? Read on to find out!

In this Diabetic & Me article you will learn about:

  • Can diabetics eat shrimp?
  • How is sugar content related to shrimp?
  • How much sugar does shrimp contain?
  • What are the benefits of eating shrimp?

Can Diabetics Eat Shrimp?


Yes, diabetics can eat shrimp without any problems. It contains even nearly zero carbohydrates and no sugar. It won't affect your blood glucose levels, therefore, a great addition to your diabetes diet.

Do make sure that the shrimp is cooked or prepared in a dish like a wok in its original state. If you batter and deep fry the shrimp, then it will be higher in fats and carbs. When you deep fry shrimp, the cooking oil penetrates its flesh which is not good for those who have heart disease as well as diabetics.

The nutritional value of seafood is dependent on how it is cooked.

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Does Seafood Raise Blood Sugar Levels?

The idea that seafood raises blood sugar levels isn't always true. If you are careful about what seafood you eat, then it can actually lower your cholesterol and glucose levels.

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends eating 2 servings of fish per week. The AHA emphasizes eating fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, trout, and sardines because these choices are especially high in omega-3 fatty acids. Limit fish like shark, swordfish, and tilefish, as these have a higher risk of mercury contamination.

Omega-3 fatty acids help us by not only regulating blood sugar levels but also reducing insulin resistance. They help to reduce the risk of heart disease and stroke which diabetics need to know about!

The way that seafood is cooked does affect its nutritional value. When you prepare shrimp in batter and deep fry it in oil, then this adds extra fat and carbs. So be careful with how you cook your seafood. If you can't avoid frying it though, make sure there isn't too much oil involved because fried foods are high in fats if they aren't prepared correctly!

What Is The Glycemic Index of Shrimp?

The glycemic index is a measurement that tells us the effect a certain food will have on our blood sugar levels.

The glycemic index (GI) and load of shrimp is 0 because they contain no carbohydrates. Eating shrimp will help you to stabilize blood sugar levels

How Much Sugar Is in 100g of Shrimp?

Shrimp contains as good as no carbohydrates and sugars. They are high in protein which is ideal for a diabetes diet.

100 grams of plain cooked shrimp contains the following nutritions.

  • Calories: 99
  • Protein: 23.9g
  • Fat: 0.3g
  • Carbohydrates: 0.2g
  • Fiber: 0

If you add high protein foods into your diabetes diet they help to stabilize blood sugar and make you feel more full.

This sustainable bag of shrimp is just waiting to be tossed into your favorite dish for a classic touch. Or, marinate the whole bag in a chef-designed marinade, lay them on some skewers with some veggies, and enjoy!

They are also perfect for tossing in salad dressings or sauces to make an extra nutritious meal more exciting. These are surprisingly affordable - it's easy to cook up a fancy gourmet feast at night when you can keep costs down with these divinely delicious responsibly sourced shrimp every day!

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What Are The Health Benefits of Eating Shrimp?

There are many benefits to eating shrimp especially if you're a diabetic. Some of these benefits are:

Protein

It contains a good amount of protein that is great for regulating your blood sugar levels and stabilizing insulin levels. High Protein Content Shrimp has 23 grams of protein per 100g serving, so it's ideal for diabetics who need the extra energy that comes from enough proteins in their diet.

Low in Carbs and Sugar

Shrimp is low in carbs and sugars which makes it a healthy food choice for diabetics to eat.

Reduce Risk Cardiovascular Disease

Eating seafood like shrimp help in managing diabetic health and helps reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, heart attacks, strokes as well as other diseases that affect those with diabetes such as kidney failure and eye problems. Overall it's a great food for your heart health.

Rich Source of Omega-3

Shrimp are a rich source of Omega-3 fatty acids which help regulate blood sugar levels. They also help to reduce cholesterol and triglyceride levels as well as helping with brain function, the nervous system, growth development of fetuses during pregnancy, your eyesight, and overall general health!

High in Vitamin B12

Shrimp are high in vitamin B12 which helps us by reducing our homocysteine levels. If you have a heart condition it's important that we keep these down so shrimp is great for this too!

High Potassium Content

This food has a good amount of potassium which keeps our body healthy and regulates electrolytes within the cells. This means your muscles work properly without cramping up or getting tired easily due to lack of potassium so they can last longer when exercising.

Conclusion

Shrimp is a great food choice for diabetics because it's low in carbs and sugars. It also contains high amounts of protein, omega-3 fatty acids, vitamin B12, potassium, and other nutrients which are essential to regulating blood sugar levels. Shrimp can be cooked any many ways you like but make sure to cook it in a natural way otherwise fried foods will have an increased risk of being unhealthy! 

About the Author

Ely Fornoville

Hi, I'm Ely Fornoville and I am the founder of Diabetic & Me. Being a type 1 diabetic since 1996 I developed a passion to help people learn more about diabetes. I write about diabetes and share stories from other diabetics around the world. I am currently using a Freestyle Libre CGM and a Minimed 640G insulin pump with Humalog.

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